Goal 2014: 3 Questions to help increase your well-being in the Year of the Male

Plug In To Access  Support

Plug In To Access Support

Have you heard the one about the man who asks his best mate for emotional support during a difficult period, and receives consistent, empathic care from his friend?  Chances are you haven’t.  Women may follow Sheryl Sandberg’s example at Facebook and ‘Lean In’ supporting each other, men don’t traditionally plug into their networks like that.

In fact British men may be spending nearly £1800 on making themselves look good outwardly according to 2012 research , but they aren’t making similar efforts to connect with their inner feelings and improve their emotional well-being.

Luckily there are new options men can adopt to tackle their well-being goals.  Those options are being explored by CALM , the mental health charity.

The charity is focusing on suicide prevention this year.  Here’s a sobering number CALM comments on , taken from a recent Office for National Statistics bulletin: suicide is the leading cause of death for British men under 50.  Such men are 3 times more likely to kill themselves than women.  That rate is comparable to the United States, where men are nearly 4 times more likely to take their own lives than women, according to the World Health Organisation .

Under the Year of the Male banner – that’s @yearofthemale on Twitter, or online at www.yearofthemale.com – the UK organisation is looking to challenge the range of influences which contribute to men’s less positive life experiences.  Perhaps we can all recognise that modern life has the potential to lead to high levels of stress, anxiety, and depression.

If you are a man and the experiences above ring bells, ask yourself how do your age, class, disability or employment status, ethnicity, family situation, religion, sexual orientation and upbringing affect your well-being?  What are you prepared to do change your well-being status this year?  Here are three more questions for you to reflect on.

  • What can you include in your health and well-being goal to make it more achievable?
  • In what ways will your goal help you live life with a greater degree of authenticity?
  • How will your goal add value to your dealings with the important people in your life?

Good luck with your actions.  Remember to check out the Archive section for more inspiration.  There are further ideas On Facebook and Google+ too

A Reminder: Your Goals Matter

Just three hours left of 2013.  Keep an eye our for two further posts before midnight.

Meanwhile, in case you missed it, this is another chance to see my recent Tweet poll about 2014 Goals.

Get in touch, if you want to start 2014 with my professional coaching support on your side. I look forward to learning about your goals.

Well-Being: Inspirational Thinking

 

Candle Flames

An Inspirational Thought

With less than 12 hours until 2014 arrives, in the UK at least, I think some inspirational words from the US are in order.

The inspiration message was offered at last summer’s May 30th 2013 Harvard commencement ceremony.  It’s available in full online, if you want to Google it.  The speaker was the hugely successful entrepreneur Oprah Winfrey.

The key take away messages?  Well-being matters.  Goals can be hard to reach.  You will be OK if you follow the direction of your own inner voice.

Enjoy this extract.  Feel free to share it, or contribute your own inspirational quote too, via the Contact page or Twitter @RogerD_said.

 

Oprah Winfrey

“…From time to time you may stumble, fall, you will for sure, count on this, no doubt, you will have questions and you will have doubts about your path. But I know this, if you’re willing to listen to, be guided by, that still small voice that is the G.P.S. within yourself, to find out what makes you come alive, you will be more than okay. You will be happy, you will be successful, and you will make a difference in the world”.

Workplace Goals in 2014

A 2014 Goal Increasing Workplace Skills (c) R Dennison December 2013

A 2014 Goal Increasing Workplace Skills (c) R Dennison December 2013

James Sproule soon takes up post as chief economist and director of policy at the Institute of Directors (IoD).  He has a vision of the UK economy in 2014.

Interviewed on the IoD website by the outgoing chief economist, Graeme Leach, Mr Sproule talks about cautious increases in consumer spending next year.  This new spending will trigger a response from companies that can demonstrate they offer value to consumers.

Companies that can respond in an agile way to digital, tech, or big data innovation will do especially well, Sprouse believes.

If this is even partially true then there will be a premium on staff with computing, coding, or analytical skills in the coming months.  It might also mean enlightened employers will encourage their staff to be flexible in gaining those broad skills, whatever their background.

I was thinking about the issue of confident and skilled staff when I read a call for advice from a demoralised 51 year old in the Guardian newspaper.  He is a strong performer in a hostile working environment.  His health is suffering; he is looking for other work options, and doubting he has skills to offer.  I believe he’ll do fine, once he embraces his opportunities.

I Tweeted my views on the situation as follows (by the way, how are you going to take action on your workplace goal for 2014?)

Contact me – by Friday 20 December – to discuss the coaching support you need to achieve your goals from January 2014.

Digital footprints

I’ve blogged about thoughtful use of social media before – most recently in the October 2012 post In Cyberspace Not Everyone ‘Likes’ You  – however a spate of recent stories caught my eye.

 

Black Eyed Peas anyone?

Black Eyed Peas anyone? (Photo credit: Twitchietai)

First, there is the revelation that seemingly innocuous ‘Likes’ on Facebook can reveal much more personal detail than users imagine.  According to a Cambridge University  study, quoted in the press, important facets of one’s personality such as social standing; religious identity; even sexual orientation are – supposedly – discernible from what users say on the platform.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/features/like-curly-fries-youre-clever-like-motorbikes-youre-not-the-science-of-facebook-likes-8530101.html

 

Then there is the sobering thought that if you get into a virtual feud with someone on Twitter they may very well track you down, for a very real confrontation.  If in doubt look at what boxer Curtis Woodhouse did to confront the critic who mocked him on line.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2013/mar/12/english-boxer-curtis-woodhouse-twitter-troll

 

Finally, there is recognition that young people are savvy consumers of new media but are not necessarily skilled in producing it.  Former Black Eyed Peas vocalist Will.i.am has donated £500,000 of his own money to the Prince’s Trust to support the development of young people’s knowledge of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (the STEM subjects) where skills are lacking.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21747206

 

Unless we choose not to have a digital presence, these stories indicate we should carefully decide just how we manage our online life.  They also nudge us to develop our relationship to new media / technology so that we keep up to date as they grows in influence.